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In Defense of Flogging

In Defense of Flogging Prisons impose tremendous costs yet they re easily ignored Criminals even low level nonviolent offenders enter our dysfunctional criminal justice system and disappear into a morass that s safely hidd

  • Title: In Defense of Flogging
  • Author: Peter Moskos
  • ISBN: 9780465021482
  • Page: 284
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Prisons impose tremendous costs, yet they re easily ignored Criminals even low level nonviolent offenders enter our dysfunctional criminal justice system and disappear into a morass that s safely hidden from public view Our tough on crime political rhetoric offers us no way out, and prison reformers are too quickly dismissed as soft on criminals Meanwhile, the taxPrisons impose tremendous costs, yet they re easily ignored Criminals even low level nonviolent offenders enter our dysfunctional criminal justice system and disappear into a morass that s safely hidden from public view Our tough on crime political rhetoric offers us no way out, and prison reformers are too quickly dismissed as soft on criminals Meanwhile, the taxpayer picks up the extraordinary and unnecessary bill.In Defense of Flogging presents a solution both radical and simple give criminals a choice between incarceration and the lash Flogging is punishment quick, cheap, and honest.Noted criminologist Peter Moskos, in irrefutable style, shows the logic of the new system while highlighting flaws in the status quo Flogging may be cruel, but In Defense of Flogging shows us that compared to our broken prison system, it is the lesser of two evils.

    • In Defense of Flogging BY Peter Moskos
      284 Peter Moskos
    • thumbnail Title: In Defense of Flogging BY Peter Moskos
      Posted by:Peter Moskos
      Published :2019-09-15T22:00:38+00:00

    About "Peter Moskos"

    1. Peter Moskos

      Peter Moskos Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the In Defense of Flogging book, this is one of the most wanted Peter Moskos author readers around the world.

    299 Comments

    1. Davis, California: UC-Davis police officer Lt. John Pike looked up from pepper-spraying student protesters and smiled dreamily. "Oh, please," he said, "may I?"At least, that's all I was going to say. I stumbled across this book on the Mother Jones' list "Our Favorite Books of the Year" and thought it was worth mocking. Oh derp, this guy wants to flog people, derp derp. But I woke up yesterday, New Year's Day, and horror of horrors, my internet was down. So instead of adding In Defense of Floggin [...]


    2. Moskos has written a devastating critique of the badly broken U.S. system of criminal "corrections." He notes that all efforts at rehabilitation have failed, and that the resulting overuse of incarceration as punishment makes no sense and costs us billions.You could probably read one hundred books about the messed-up U.S. prison-industrial complex, but this is the ONLY book you will find that provides the clever, compelling solution of substituting OPTIONAL corporal punishment for incarceration [...]


    3. I heartily agree with this books conclusions but am dismayed at the number of factual issues the author glosses over or outright gets wrong. Most glaring, he really seems to miss when police could administer home beatings as swift justice, ignoring how often that power was misused and how often it undoubtedly would be today.


    4. This is an extended essay that argues that rather than have mass incarceration (with all its attendent inhumane conditions and horrific impact on millions) the US should reintroduce flogging as a non-custodial punishment. It does not argue for flogging and incarceration, incarceration is only to be reserved for those who are a continued danger to society. First, let me say what I liked about the book. Moskos actually makes a recommendation for what is to be done that is different. It's very easy [...]


    5. I liked the concept but its tone is too similar to the one your over zealous uncle uses at Xmas when explaining his theories on what REALLY happened to Hiler's brain.


    6. Gahis book was so painful to read. It was basically like being forced to listen to a self-righteous, arrogant guy shoot off his mouth and not being able to leave. I couldn't leave because I really did want to see what he had to say about this topic, since I find it a very important and urgent issue, which few in America want to face. He did have some good arguments, and I actually agree with his main premise, which is that the prison system is completely broken, corrupt, and ineffective, and tha [...]


    7. The book is basically two books: one against both the present system of mass incarceration and the ineffectual programs of prison reform thereof; and one for flogging as a more humane, effective, and socializing alternative for punishing criminals. The former is not entirely convincing, as he generally overstates his case and caricatures proponents of incarceration, though he makes many strong points; the latter is quite potent and persuasive. The book could be criticized as disingenuously defen [...]


    8. Two words: BRILLIANT IDEA. The author proposes to tear the whole rotten prison-industrial complex down to the ankles and start over. His idea for an alternative to the current ruin-the-convict's-life system is modest, but incredibly sweeping, and threatens to make life survivable again for almost anyone in the USA who commits a small-to-medium crime. This is a must read for anyone who suspects we may be doing something wrong by imprisoning more citizens per capita than almost any other country o [...]


    9. I loved the content. It was thought provoking and educational. The writer presented so much history and information here. It really impacted my view of our US prison system.I found myself wishing the author had worked with a different editor though. This book is structured more like of a very long sectioned essay than a book. It lacked some of the logical break points that would have made its contents easier to consume and understand. The author presents a good amount of data in context of histo [...]


    10. I never thought I would find myself thinking the guy making the case for corporal punishment had a point but Moskos raises several important issues regarding the American legal system. People rotting in prison for months or years without ever having been convicted of a crime is no more civilized than flogging. I can't bring myself to say that flogging is preferable but the very fact that such comparisons can be made tells you just how bad things are at the moment. Overall the book is well argued [...]


    11. A discussion about the need for the reformation of legal punishment, since jail sentencing is expensive, ineffective, and cruel. Flogging is cruel, too, the author argues, but, unlike prison sentences, it's over quickly, is cheap, and doesn't render the punished unhireable, as prison sentences do. Is it the fix to a broken penal system? Probably not, but as Moskos convincingly argues, it's better than what we currently have in place. (And flogging in lieu of prison time, Moskos argues, should be [...]


    12. I Liked it. A lot of history in a small volume. It will never beadopted that flogging someone and let them go on thier way. I wouldconsider a life of crime if all you had to worry about was 5 minutesof pain, well more than five minutes a few weeks and you would be backto old thieving self. The book like the concept of quick justice isonly 170 pages and large type so it like flogging was over in a flash.


    13. On the last page: "If you feel half-convinced and slightly queasy, well, good. That was my goal." A very provoking read. This would be a *great* text for any number of courses — rhetoric, comp, social justice most of my comments about it are turning into serials; I think I'll blog this one.


    14. Finished this a few days ago, but forgot to update it. An intriguing argument, and a very strong critical analysis of modern sentencing policy in much of the democratic world. Of particular interest to those who are involved in the criminal justice system or policymaking.


    15. This book really opened my eyes to our (U.S.) modern day prison system. While I don't agree with the author on all counts, I do believe our current system is irreparably broken and new measures need to be taken. What he posits may not be the best answer, but at least it is AN answer.


    16. This books should be taken as a long essay giving a very basic argument for corporal punishment as an alternative to incarceration. It's interesting, accessible and personal. It's also brief, and by no means comprehensive, which is what Moskos is going for.




    17. A good, quick read. While the material could be expanded, and some of the assumptions challenged, it lends a new perspective to those that may find corporal punishments objectionable.


    18. An easy read. Lays out the brutality, ineffectiveness and immorality of the United States's practice of incarceration.



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