Books

Life Under Compulsion: Ten Ways to Destroy the Humanity of Your Child

Life Under Compulsion Ten Ways to Destroy the Humanity of Your Child How to raise children who can sit with a good book and read Who are moved by beauty Who delight in innocence Who have no compulsions who don t have to buy the latest this or that vanity Who are not bo

  • Title: Life Under Compulsion: Ten Ways to Destroy the Humanity of Your Child
  • Author: Anthony M. Esolen
  • ISBN: 9781610170949
  • Page: 177
  • Format: Hardcover
  • How to raise children who can sit with a good book and read Who are moved by beauty Who delight in innocence Who have no compulsions who don t have to buy the latest this or that vanity Who are not bound to the instant urge, wherever it may be found Thoughtful parents everywhere ask such questions but struggle to find answers But now, in this eagerly anticipated folHow to raise children who can sit with a good book and read Who are moved by beauty Who delight in innocence Who have no compulsions who don t have to buy the latest this or that vanity Who are not bound to the instant urge, wherever it may be found Thoughtful parents everywhere ask such questions but struggle to find answers But now, in this eagerly anticipated follow up to his acclaimed book Ten Ways to Destroy the Imagination of Your Child, Anthony Esolen shows the way.Although freedom has become a byword of our age, Esolen shows why the common understanding of freedom as a permission slip to do as you please is narrow, misleading and dangerous He draws on great thinkers of the Western tradition, from Aristotle and Cicero to Dante and Shakespeare to John Adams and C.S Lewis, to remind us what human freedom truly means.Life Under Compulsion shows why our children are not free at all but in fact are becoming slaves to compulsions Some compulsions come from without government mandates that determine what children are taught, and even what they can eat in school Others come from within the itches that must be scratched, the passions by which children like the rest of us can be mastered.Common Core, smartphones, video games, sex ed, travel teams, Twitter, politicians, popular music, advertising, a world with genders than there are flavours of ice cream these and many other aspects of contemporary life come under Esolen s sweeping gaze in Life Under Compulsion.This elegantly written book restores lost wisdom about education, parenting, literature, music, art, philosophy, and leisure It also restates the importance of concepts so often dismissed today truth, beauty, goodness, love, faith, and virtue But above all else, it reminds us of a fundamental truth that a child is a human being Countercultural in the best sense of term, Life Under Compulsion is an indispensable guide for any parent who wants to help a child remove the shackles and enjoy a truly free, and full, life.

    • Life Under Compulsion: Ten Ways to Destroy the Humanity of Your Child By Anthony M. Esolen
      177 Anthony M. Esolen
    • thumbnail Title: Life Under Compulsion: Ten Ways to Destroy the Humanity of Your Child By Anthony M. Esolen
      Posted by:Anthony M. Esolen
      Published :2019-04-05T21:55:40+00:00

    About "Anthony M. Esolen"

    1. Anthony M. Esolen

      Anthony M Esolen is a professor of English at Thomas More College, and noted translator of classic works, as well as a popular writer for magazines like the Claremont Review and Touchstone, of which he is a senior editor He has translated Dante s Divine Comedy, Lucretius On the Nature of Things, and Torquato Tasso s Jerusalem Delivered He also writes a column for the Inside Catholic website.After graduating from Princeton University summa cum laude in 1981, he received his MA in 1983 and then his Ph.D in 1987 from the University of North Carolina His dissertation was titled A Rhetoric of Spenserian Irony He taught at that university from 1985 to 1988 and then at Furman University from 1988 to 1990 He began teaching at Providence College in 1990, becoming a full professor in 1995 He joined the faculty of Thomas More College of the Liberal Arts in 2017.

    824 Comments

    1. I really enjoyed this book, as Esolen continues themes already sketched out by folks like Chesterton, Lewis, Wendell Berry, and many "paleo-cons" on the dehumanizing effects of the modern liberal-progressive way of looking at the world. By this description, I do not mean the far left or radical progressives, but rather the ordinary and normal technocratic egalitarian pragmaticism that most everyone assumes about life. Esolen points us back to a classical vision of "freedom," goodness, and a rich [...]



    2. Contrary to the title, this book is not just for parents, but for anyone interested in restoring sanity and grace to her life, especially if she is a little too cozy with facebook or twitter. I love a book that challenges me to think about things in a different way, to see things as I had not seen them before--in this case, all the compulsions that crowd my life, and what they might be doing to interfere with my freedom (for the opposite of compulsion is freedom). So many good things to think ab [...]



    3. Anthony Esolen's critique of modern atheistic, state-controlled culture given through the lens of education and how we raise our children can in places be devastating, but I found his tone off-putting at times -- somewhat mocking and condescending. Since I agreed with everything criticism he made, I never put the book down, but I wonder if someone else picked up the book -- someone who needed a little convincing that the current set of liberal cultural givens need examining and ultimately, to be [...]


    4. You probably shouldn't read this book.It almost offended me every once in awhile, and I'm pretty conservative. Esolen is like the Jon Stewart of conservatives. It's that level of snark, only turned against those who live without God, those whom he considers "a commuter at best, or a tourist, or a prisoner" riding on the bus of Evolutionary Progress or The Right Side of History or whatever other contemporary brand of self-assurance might seem to offer purpose and meaning to life without God.And y [...]


    5. Esolen analyzes modern culture in this thought-provoking and sometimes heart-wrenching book, describing what an ideal culture might look like and how far modern culture is from that ideal. A Lewis-like wandering writing style was my only complaint, but otherwise this book is well worth the read.


    6. This was the first (and still only) book I read in Kindle, which was an interesting experience. Once I figured out how Kindle works - bookmarking, highlighting, the ability to look up words, is was fun. However, I still prefer actually holding the book and making notes and observations as needed. I have become familiar with Esolen over the last few years reading his essays - How the Church Changed the World - in the monthly Magnificat. He has a very fluid style, reminiscent of forms of writing h [...]


    7. Anthony Esolen challenges the reader to live a life of true freedom. Many Americans today worship "liberty" as a religion of choice. Esolen encourages the reader to avoid using "freedom/liberty" as abstract "virtue" terms as most do in the modern understanding where these terms are almost universally meant as choice without government compulsion, without the greater responsibility of moral duty. This concept of "liberty/freedom" is in direct contradiction to an understanding of the dignity of th [...]


    8. I don't think words can express how good or how profound this book isbut if it can be expressed in words, Anthony Esolen is the person who could do it satisfactorily. He has a knack for solidifying thoughts I didn't quite realize I was already thinking. I suppose that's what happens when truth is spoken. It seems to be instantly recognizable for what it is.I recommend this book to everyone.


    9. The book is excellent in analyzing the problems that face us today and cause our children, as well as ourselves, to be less that what we can and should be. Read the book and explore the ways in which to broaden your child's world and help them to become a fuller and richer created being.




    10. In the introduction, Esolen explains his purpose: “I believe we are bringing our children up not for the freedom we enjoy but for the compulsions we suffer. Some of those compulsions we even mistake for freedom, so that the more of them we win, the more tightly we bind ourselves, body and soul.”Freedom according to Esolen is what Aquinas defined as not doing what one pleases, but realizing the fulfilment of your natural and created being, without impediments. Man’s nature should drive him [...]


    11. Despite the title, this book really has nothing to do with child-rearing. It has everything to do with what it means to be human.Esolen has a good way with words and makes a lot of interesting and helpful points in this book. I particularly liked his discussion of how the meaning of the word "rhetoric" has changed over the past century or so, and he also made a lot of good points on what true compulsion actually is. There was a lot of underlining done in this book.That being said, I felt like Es [...]


    12. This book could easily be condensed by hundreads of pages. It is all flowery words and quotations of famous people and little on substance. I agreed with the mains points of the book that I made it too before I quit. But I got tired of slogging through 90 lines about god or some parable to actually get to 5 lines of substance. If written in a consise and clear way this book would be half as long and possibly a good read.


    13. Wow! I usually do not read the marketing junk associated with a book. Sometimes, like in this case, it might be a mistake. This is a fundamentalist book about terrorizing the young. Talking about semantics: compulsion is the word for choice, the same way as freedom is the only freedom a backward individual with imaginary friends can have: the freedom to obey. Scary text. Humanity means the state of a tame pet.


    14. Anthony Esolen is a conservative Catholic college professor and social commentator whose blog posts and articles about topics such as free speech have been very interesting to me following the 2016 election. In this book (published in 2015), Esolen uses lovely allusions to classic works of literature to build compelling arguments against much of the political correctness, revisionist history, and cultural corruption he observes in the US. He writes beautifully, confidently and passionately about [...]


    15. I don't really know how to describe this book except to say that it is fantastic. Esolen is a Christian classicist who understands what to means to truly live as free men. This book is less about parenting, as the subtitle would seem to suggest, and more about what it means to be human. The "ten ways" are actually reflections on ways in which our modern culture has strayed so far from the God-imaging ideal. In education, we force children to think certain ways, the pre-approved, P.C. opinions of [...]


    16. Better than _Ten Ways to Destroy the Imagination of Your Child_; largely because Esolen drops the facetious (Screwtape-ian) concept of the earlier work and here shares his thoughts more directly and genuinely. Esolen's thoughts are a pleasure to spend time with; not since Neil Postman has cultural commentary been presented with such excellence of both observation and expression. Although he wobbles here and there (he can't resist an infrequent disparaging remark about climate change, for example [...]


    17. When coming upon Thoreau's observation that "the mass of men lead lives of quiet desperation," there is a certain kind of reader who feels like writing in the margin, "How would you know, fathead?" I admit that if I am not that kind of reader, I am spiritually akin to him, and though I enjoy a good jeremiad as much as the next man I tend to approach them with a certain amount of skepticism. Esolen has written a good jeremiad here, based on the simple truth that the life of virtue is the life of [...]



    18. A book to read and reread for yourself not just your children. "I am writing this book because I believe we are bringing up our children not for the freedom we enjoy but for the compulsions we suffer. Some of those compulsions we even mistake for freedom, so that the more of them we win, the more tightly we bind ourselves body and soul.""It is not so much what the soul possesses as what possesses the soul."


    19. While Esolen occasionally indulges in a "good-old-days"ism that is somewhat tedious and annoying, this is quite occasional, and on the whole this is one of the finest books I have read not only on parenting, but on life in general. A helpful critique of our compulsion, productivity, and technology driven culture.


    20. I'm thinking that this might be the best book I've read all year - definitely one of the very best!! Not just for parents as the title suggests - but really recommended reading for everyone.


    Leave a Comment