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The Global Achievement Gap: Why Even Our Best Schools Don't Teach the New Survival Skills Our Children Need --And What We Can Do about It

The Global Achievement Gap Why Even Our Best Schools Don t Teach the New Survival Skills Our Children Need And What We Can Do about It In The Global Achievement Gap education expert Tony Wagner situates our school problems in the larger context of the demands of the global knowledge economy With insights gained from visits to classr

  • Title: The Global Achievement Gap: Why Even Our Best Schools Don't Teach the New Survival Skills Our Children Need --And What We Can Do about It
  • Author: Tony Wagner
  • ISBN: 9780786731749
  • Page: 196
  • Format: ebook
  • In The Global Achievement Gap, education expert Tony Wagner situates our school problems in the larger context of the demands of the global knowledge economy With insights gained from visits to classrooms in leading suburban schools, he analyzes performance by considering the skills needed to get a good job and become a productive citizen Highlighting discussions withIn The Global Achievement Gap, education expert Tony Wagner situates our school problems in the larger context of the demands of the global knowledge economy With insights gained from visits to classrooms in leading suburban schools, he analyzes performance by considering the skills needed to get a good job and become a productive citizen Highlighting discussions with young people and the adults who work with them, Wagner also explains the ways in which todayOCOs generation is differently motivated to excel.A manifesto for the twenty first century, The Global Achievement Gap is a must read for anyone interested in seeing our young people achieve their full potential.

    • The Global Achievement Gap: Why Even Our Best Schools Don't Teach the New Survival Skills Our Children Need --And What We Can Do about It >> Tony Wagner
      196 Tony Wagner
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      Published :2019-06-14T09:22:33+00:00

    About "Tony Wagner"

    1. Tony Wagner

      Tony Wagner recently accepted a position as the first Innovation Education Fellow at the Technology Entrepreneurship Center at Harvard Prior to this, he was the founder and co director of the Change Leadership Group at the Harvard Graduate School of Education for than a decade.Tony consults widely to schools, districts, and foundations around the country and internationally His previous work experience includes twelve years as a high school teacher, K 8 principal, university professor in teacher education, and founding executive director of Educators for Social Responsibility.Tony is also a frequent speaker at national and international conferences and a widely published author His work includes numerous articles and five books Tony s latest, Creating Innovators The Making of Young People Who Will Change The World, will be published in April by Simon Schuster His recent book, The Global Achievement Gap Why Even Our Best Schools Don t Teach the New Survival Skills Our Children Need and What We Can do About It has been a best seller and is being translated into Chinese Tony s other titles include Change Leadership A Practical Guide to Transforming Our Schools, Making the Grade Reinventing America s Schools, and How Schools Change Lessons from Three Communities Revisited He has also recently collaborated with noted filmmaker Robert Compton to create a 60 minute documentary, The Finnish Phenomenon Inside The World s Most Surprising School System Tony earned an M.A.T and an Ed.D at the Harvard University Graduate School of Education.

    460 Comments

    1. Interesting book. I am a high school teacher and I wholeheartedly agreed with half of it. I see more truth in his critique of problems with the teaching profession than I relate to his observation of high school classrooms.Wagner's main point, and the one I both agree with and struggle with, is that students need to be thinking critically and collaborating in all their classes. I work to incorporate collaboration into my classes, and try to include as much critical thinking as I can. It is often [...]


    2. The title pretty much sums up the book. I began reading this book over the summer. I was about 1/3 of the way through and decided to stop reading the book and return it to the library. Why? Because there was so much great content that I was spending more time writing out my notes than actually reading the book. I recently purchased the book for my iPad so I could highlight and type my notes. This proved a much more productive method(and lead me to a thought on education practices) and allowed me [...]


    3. I'm a little weary of apocalyptic rhetoric in every genre, so I approached this with a skeptical eye. The author outlines "seven survival skills" for the future that every child should learn, and honestly, that kind of thing is always intellectually difficult for me to grasp, and seems very amorphous: critical thinking and problem solving, collaboration across networks, etc.More helpful to me were the notes from the "learning walks" the author conducts at various schools, where he provided speci [...]


    4. There was nothing new in it for me but I gave it 5 stars nonetheless as it was published as far back as 2008 and I figure it must have been pretty eye-opening at the time. Basically, the idea of the book is as follows: if you are expected to drive well, you need to spend more time actually driving rather than learning different car parts by heart. 21 century has its own required set of skills to be "successful". School experience is detached from the reality and in no way prepares for life. Teac [...]


    5. I found this book to be extremely repetitive and highly disappointing. While I do not have all the answers and certainly agree with Wagner's stance on the lack of "rigor" in over-hyped Advanced Placement factories in the suburbs, Wagner continuously went back to the question: W.Ds.W. That is: "What do CEOs want?" as if CEOs of major corporations are the epitome of Wagner's seven survival skills for teens today. It is comical to read -- though not surprising seeing Wagner is a member of the found [...]


    6. Many American students would expect the United States to be a leading country in healthcare and education but in fact the United States is ranked 17th in educational performance in the world. The education system is faulty at its core since it is stuck in a trance teaching to the methods that were developed for the past. Nowadays employers are expecting students who know and can fluidly use the seven survival skills. These skills are proven to be necessary in the book by Tony Wagner, The Global [...]


    7. I'm very delayed in sending out this review. I read this book back in 2009, and had the good fortune of then engaging Tony Wagner to come to Maine to keynote an education conference at the time the state's leadership was changing. Oddly, the Maine Education Commissioner tried to embrace the book/author's recommendations, but was blocked at every turn by Governor LePage. That being said, this book takes the research from enormous studies that identified the seven specific skills missing in our em [...]


    8. I shared many quotes and thoughts from this book on my Facebook account. In general, I love Dr. Wagner's emphasis on his Seven Survival Skills and the understanding that our education system needs to be reinvented and reimagined in order to reflect the needs of 21st century learners, workers, and citizens. I also appreciate his call for more effective assessments that are performance- and portfolio-based over the typical multiple-choice recall assessments that have been used for decades. There a [...]


    9. A great book anyone should read. I purposely say anyone, because all of us shape the schools in our communities. Wagner does a great job of calling out just why our schools desperately need to change for the better to meet the demands of the 21st century economy. I use this book so much the pages are starting to fall out.


    10. We are reading this book as mandatory summer reading for my school. It details what's wrong with most schools and how to get it right. Wagner affirms for me what I believe in educational best practices: highly recommended!



    11. My notes:-Definition of critical thinking: "taking issues and situations and problems and going to root components; understanding how the problems evolved--looking at it from a systemic perspective and not accepting things at face value. It also means being curious about why things are the way they are and being able to think about why something is important" (p. 16)-"you need to start teaching critical thinking as soon as children are capable of abstract thinking" (p. 17)-Critical thinking mean [...]


    12. This is a fine read. But if you are in the market for a much better book on education then read Class Warfare by Steven Brill. The book is strange in some ways. For example, Wagner goes off on brief and random tangents about global warming that had nothing to do with the topic. Wagner also ignores a lot research that Brill tackles in Class Warfare. There is good stuff in The Global Achievement Gap, but your time is better spent on something else.


    13. An extremely engaging book that addresses a topic in a manner that the leaders of this country really need to consider the direction that educational reform needs to follow. Too much testing to assess student comprehension levels that do not even provide information that is reliable. Tony Wagner does an excellent job in providing guidance that all educators could follow to provide a positive educational experience for all the students.


    14. This was a great book! It made me think about a lot of important things and inspired me to want to go out and make a difference! It reminded me a lot of the movie “Waiting for Superman,” but it had more specific ideas for improving education and the culture of education in our country now. It reminded me so much of the work I was doing in DC – to inspire educators to be leaders and to encourage a culture change at the Department of Education. This is such interesting and important stuff! E [...]


    15. If you feel ready for life, you’re wrong. Studies have shown that, “Only about a third of U.S. high school students graduate ready for college today… Forty percent of all students who enter college must take remedial courses” (xix). In Tony Wagner’s The Global Achievement Gap, the author introduces facts about the current state of the education system. He argues that the education system in the U.S. is very outdated, causing students to drop out of school. First, Wagner talks about wha [...]


    16. Survival Skills over Standardized TestingI likened Tony Wagner’s The Global Achievement Gap more to Thomas Friedman’s The World is Flat than any other academic treatise on the quality of secondary education in America. If I had the money, I would buy a copy of this book for every governor, congressman and senator; this book presents a fair better direction for education politics than the current thoughts from Washington.Based on his professional experiences as a teacher and academic, as well [...]


    17. He makes good points about critical thinking. I teach at the undergrad level in nursing and see a profound lack of critical thinking in both students and young nurses although this is supposed to be a core competency in the field. On the other hand, his methods require a enormous investments of both time and effort from teachers (in addition to current expectations) and he explicitly states that teachers in his example excellent schools have income comporable to those in surrounding schools whil [...]


    18. Two major premises of Wagner's book I don't really agree with:1. Corporate & business types know what is best for K-12 education.2. The current internet-enabled generation is fundamentally different from all previous generations.Also, Wagner has a clear lack of understanding of math & science and is on very shaky ground whenever discussing these subjects. He makes claims such as the periodic table is "constantly changing" (it is not) and says something like, "No one has explained to me t [...]


    19. Wagner's critique and analysis of the American education is a rather common one: America's schools are behind in test scores, global competitiveness, and overall achievement levels. Wagner's book aims to analyze the problem, where it arose from, what America's schools are like today, what genuinely successful schools are like, and what certain schools can do to get there, all wrapped up in his own set of necessary twenty-first century skills. It does about three-fourths of that very well.Wagner' [...]


    20. This was time well spent. Wagner did a solid job building the framework for understanding why and how the global terrain of work, economy and global relationships has changed. Building on the educational implications, he made sound arguments for the benefits of reviewing how we prepare students for productive, skilled lives in this new environment. He bases his framework for change in 7 Survival Skills: 1) Critical Thinking & Problem Solving 2) Collaborating Across Networks 3)Agility and Ada [...]


    21. A few weeks ago, I heard Tony Wagner speak in New York. I was so impressed with what he said about skills students need exiting school today that I wanted to learn more. Published in 2008, Wagner's work has influenced policy making decisions across our country's schools. He contends that, while there many criticize public schools, the criticism is misguided. He argues that schools have not failed; rather, schools have become obsolete. This is a major shift in a time when "accountability and sanc [...]


    22. This author really knows his stuff, clearly cares about education, and his writing style and formula are well suited to the topic. He asserts that "Seven Survival Skills" are the essence of how educators should form their objectives for establishing a foundation of lifelong learning - that these are the skills our youth need in order to be productive within and to continue to advance our society. He supports this well with anecdotes, vignettes, and hard data and reminds the reader of this essent [...]


    23. Wagner argues that our school systems were designed for the needs of students 100 years ago. That No Child Left Behind has encouraged schools and teachers to emphasize content over everything including learning, curiosity and skills. This is ridiculous in a world with the internet. Children don't need to memorize facts, they need to know how to interpret and evaluate vast quantities of facts. The ability to ask and answer questions is far better than "knowing something."Wagner presents seven "su [...]


    24. Take away(s):1. Ask the right questions2. Have the students learn to ask the questionsleadership: influence vs. authoritycommunication skills are bigask why. Why do you say/believe/think that?Accessing and analyzing informationmath lesson (p. 65 and 66): - a problem they have not seen before - use prior knowledge and group - come up with TWO (2) possible solutions - randomly pick one member of group to present each solution to class(92) does advanced math train us to be better problem solvers?Im [...]


    25. What Friedman did for commerce and industry with his book, The World Is Flat, Wagner does here with education--he calls for action against slipping further and further behind in our schools against the international competition. But the best thing about this highly readable and informative book is that Wagner provides solutions. Not to read this book is a travesty for anyone who is involved in education--I don't care if you are a friend or foe. First and foremost, he stresses that what our young [...]


    26. I'm reading this for our School Superintendent's book discussion and its a topic I am quite interested in. There is a lot of pressure for rigor in the classroom and teaching kids a lot of stuff - but it seems little emphasis on how to do any of it well, anymore than necessary to pass the MSAs, at least, or how to understand what they have done. They are being taught basic probability and how to read a bar graph in 1st grade, but what's the point when they still don't know what it really means an [...]


    27. Take away(s):1. Ask the right questions2. Have the students learn to ask the questionsleadership: influence vs. authoritycommunication skills are bigask why. Why do you say/believe/think that?Accessing and analyzing informationmath lesson (p. 65 and 66): - a problem they have not seen before - use prior knowledge and group - come up with TWO (2) possible solutions - randomly pick one member of group to present each solution to class(92) does advanced math train us to be better problem solvers?Im [...]


    28. If you are interested in the education of your children, then you need to read this book! The first half tells us what is wrong with our education system; I skipped a lot of that because I see the problems and want to be part of the solution.The second half gives recommendations and schools making changes and what they do to be successful and give kids a successful education.The Global Achievement Gap talks about how other countries are years ahead of ours in education, math, science, etc. becau [...]


    29. This is a very interesting read. I certainly agree with the need to cultivate in our children the "seven survival skills" described by Wagner: critical thinking, collaboration, adaptability, initiative, effective oral and written communication, research and analysis, and curiosity and imagination - along with our need to encourage students to be more invested and accountable in their education. Chapter 5 on Motivating Students and New Workers seemed to be the weakest in an otherwise forceful boo [...]


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