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Power and Imagination: City-States in Renaissance Italy

Power and Imagination City States in Renaissance Italy The Italian Renaissance writes Lauro Martines came forth in two stages The first extended from the eleventh century to about the second from the late thirteenth to the late sixteenth centuries

  • Title: Power and Imagination: City-States in Renaissance Italy
  • Author: Lauro Martines
  • ISBN: 9780801836435
  • Page: 210
  • Format: Paperback
  • The Italian Renaissance, writes Lauro Martines, came forth in two stages The first extended from the eleventh century to about 1300, the second from the late thirteenth to the late sixteenth centuries In the first period, social energies economics, politics, a vibrant demography were primary and foremost in the second, cultural energies seemed to dominate In PowerThe Italian Renaissance, writes Lauro Martines, came forth in two stages The first extended from the eleventh century to about 1300, the second from the late thirteenth to the late sixteenth centuries In the first period, social energies economics, politics, a vibrant demography were primary and foremost in the second, cultural energies seemed to dominate In Power and Imagination, Lauro Martines rethinks the evolution of the city state in Renaissance Italy and recasts the conventional distinction between society and culture He traces the growth of commerce and the evolution of governments he describes the attitudes, pleasures and rituals of the ruling elite he seeks to understand the period s towering works of the imagination in literature, painting, city planning and philosophy not simply as the creations of individual artists, but as the formal expression of the ambitions and egos of those in power.

    • Power and Imagination: City-States in Renaissance Italy « Lauro Martines
      210 Lauro Martines
    • thumbnail Title: Power and Imagination: City-States in Renaissance Italy « Lauro Martines
      Posted by:Lauro Martines
      Published :2019-07-05T18:39:09+00:00

    About "Lauro Martines"

    1. Lauro Martines

      Lauro Martines , former Professor of European History at the University of California, Los Angeles, is renowned for his books on the Italian Renaissance The author of Power and Imagination City States in Renaissance Italy, and most recently of Strong Words Writing and Social Strain in the Italian Renaissance, he reviews for The Times Literary Supplement and lives in London with his wife, novelist Julia O Faolain.

    724 Comments

    1. This is really two books that sit uneasily together.One is a fascinating and shockingly coherent explanation of Italian Renaissance politics. Somehow the author is able to draw clear generalizations and theories from the continual chaos of Italy in what might be called the long Renaissance, about 1000-1600 AD. He traces the decline of the Holy Roman Empires fiefs and the rise of ducal bishops (to around 1050), followed by and the rise of the urban "communes," their decline into internecine warfa [...]


    2. Lauro Martines does an excellent job of describing the pre-Renaissance period in the Italian city-states that led to one of the greatest periods of upheaval and change (and a few more centuries of anarchy in Italy). It is an interesting read and highly suggested to read before visiting cities in central and northern Italy such as Pisa, Florence, Milan, Sienna, etc because it gives you the historical context in which these cities became what they are today and how the period despite the violence [...]


    3. Martines is not the most sparkling prose stylist, and he and I disagree about Savonarola. But this is an interesting broad sweep that told me some things I didn't know and made me think a lot. I wouldn't recommend this for a non-specialist, but I think it would be very useful for anyone who wants to think about how people's ideas about what a state is change what a state is over time.


    4. One of the best books I've read for one of my classes while doinbg my BA in History. It's magnificent and there's so much you learn from the middle ages and renaissance not just from Italy but in general like where the author describes the repercusions shift from power in different sectors affected the rest of Europe, primarily the cloth industry and agriculture. At the same time you realize how different the Italian states were from the rest of Western Europe, except for military takeovers (and [...]


    5. I have been fascinated by Italian city states and this book satisfied all my curiosity. It details every aspect of the rise and fall of the Italian city states, the Renaissance and daily (high society) life. Quite dense and sometimes I found the structuring to be confusing. Also, I would have preferred a more matter of fact writing style.


    6. I was with it right up until the transition into the Renaissance proper, at which point my own interpretation of circumstances diverges wildly. Mostly interesting for the generalities of the rise of the medieval communes and the eventual transition into Renaissance states, such as they were.


    7. I thought that this was a decent book on Renaissance Italy. Since I am not a specialist in that area, I can't really assess it properly.



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